North Carolina's 5th congressional district

Coordinates: 36°08′42″N 80°57′38″W / 36.14500°N 80.96056°W / 36.14500; -80.96056
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

North Carolina's 5th congressional district
Map
Map
Interactive map of district boundaries
Representative
  Virginia Foxx
RBanner Elk
Population (2022)754,512[1]
Median household
income
$54,503[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+13[2]
Created1789

North Carolina's 5th congressional district covers the central western portion of North Carolina from the Appalachian Mountains to the western suburbs of the Piedmont Triad. The district borders Tennessee and Virginia, with the bulk of its territory in the mountains; it stretches just far enough to the east to grab its share of Forsyth County, home to most of its population.

The district is overwhelmingly Republican. Large portions were controlled by Republicans even during the "Solid South" era as much of northwestern North Carolina was Quaker[3] or mountaineer and therefore resisted secession.[4] Two counties in the district – Avery and Yadkin – have never voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since their creation, and Wilkes County has never done so since before the Second Party System. For the 2020 election the district has been updated per House Bill 1029[5] enacted by the NC General Assembly on November 15, 2019, becoming Session Law 2019–249. District boundaries are based on 2010 census tabulation blocks.

On February 23, 2022, the North Carolina Supreme Court approved a new map which changed the 5th district boundaries to include Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Davie, Mitchell, Stokes, Surry, Watauga, Wilkes County and Yadkin Counties, most of Caldwell and part of Forsyth.[6]

The fifth district is currently represented by Virginia Foxx, a Republican.

Counties[edit]

Counties in the 2023–2025 congressional district map:

List of members representing the district[edit]

Member
(Residence)
Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
District established June 16, 1790

John Sevier
(Southwest Territory)
Pro-Administration June 16, 1790 –
March 3, 1791
1st Elected in 1790.
District ceded by the state to the Federal government in 1789 but permitted to serve anyway although he wasn't representing any part of a state.
1790–1791
"Western division"
William B. Grove
(Fayetteville)
Pro-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
2nd Elected in 1791.
Redistricted to the 7th district after original district ceded to federal government to later become Tennessee.
1791–1793
"Cape Fear division"

Nathaniel Macon
(Warrenton)
Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
Redistricted from the 2nd districtand re-elected in 1793.
Re-elected in 1795.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 6th district.
1793–1803
[data missing]
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1803
James Gillespie
(Kenansville)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
8th Elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1804.
Died.
1803–1813
"North Carolina congressional district map (1803–13)".[7]
Thomas Kenan
(Kenansville)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1811
9th
10th
11th
Elected August 8, 1805 to begin Gillespie's term.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Retired.

William R. King
(Wilmington)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 –
November 4, 1816
12th
13th
14th
Elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1813.
Re-elected in 1815.
Resigned.
1813–1823
"North Carolina congressional district map (1813–43)".[8]
Vacant November 4, 1816 –
December 2, 1816
14th
Charles Hooks
(Dublin)
Democratic-Republican December 2, 1816 –
March 3, 1817
Elected to finish King's term.
Lost re-election.
James Owen
(Elizabethtown)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
15th Elected in 1817.
Lost re-election.
Charles Hooks
(Dublin)
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1823
16th
17th
18th
Elected in 1819.
Re-elected in 1821.
Re-elected in 1823.
Lost re-election.
March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
1823–1833
"North Carolina congressional district map (1813–43)".[9]
Gabriel Holmes
(Clinton)
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
September 26, 1829
19th
20th
21st
Elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Re-elected in 1829.
Died.
Vacant September 26, 1829 –
November 10, 1829
21st

Edward B. Dudley
(Wilmington)
Jacksonian November 10, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
Elected November 10, 1829 to finish Holmes's term and seated December 14, 1829.
[data missing]

James I. McKay
(Elizabethtown)
Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1837
22nd
23rd
24th
25th
26th
27th
Elected in 1831.
Re-elected in 1833.
Re-elected in 1835.
Re-elected in 1837.
Re-elected in 1839.
Re-elected in 1841.
Redistricted to the 6th district.
1833–1843
"North Carolina congressional district map (1813–43)".[10]
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1843

Romulus M. Saunders
(Raleigh)
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1843.
[data missing]
1843–1853
[data missing]

James C. Dobbin
(Fayetteville)
Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Elected in 1845.
[data missing]

Abraham W. Venable
(Bronwsville)
Democratic March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1853
30th
31st
32nd
Elected in 1847.
Re-elected in 1849.
Re-elected in 1851.
[data missing]
John Kerr Jr.
(Yanceyville)
Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Elected in 1853.
[data missing]
1853–1861
[data missing]

Edwin G. Reade
(Roxboro)
Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th Elected in 1855.
[data missing]

John A. Gilmer
(Greensboro)
Know Nothing March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th
36th
Elected in 1857.
Re-elected in 1859.
[data missing]
Opposition March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
Vacant March 3, 1861 –
July 20, 1868
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th
Civil War and Reconstruction

Israel G. Lash
(Salem)
Republican July 20, 1868 –
March 3, 1871
40th
41st
Elected to finish the short term.
Re-elected in 1868.
[data missing]
1868–1873
[data missing]

James M. Leach
(Lexington)
Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1875
42nd
43rd
Elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
[data missing]
1873–1883
[data missing]

Alfred M. Scales
(Greensboro)
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
December 30, 1884
44th
45th
46th
47th
48th
Elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Resigned when elected governor of North Carolina.
1883–1893
[data missing]
Vacant December 30, 1884 –
January 28, 1885
48th
James W. Reid
(Wentworth)
Democratic January 28, 1885 –
December 31, 1886
48th
49th
Elected to finish Scales's term.
Resigned.
Vacant December 31, 1886 –
March 3, 1887
49th
John M. Brower
(Mount Airy)
Republican March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1891
50th
51st
Elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
[data missing]
Archibald H. A. Williams
(Oxford)
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
[data missing]

Thomas Settle III
(Reidsville)
Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1897
53rd
54th
Elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
[data missing]
1893–1903
[data missing]

William W. Kitchin
(Roxboro)
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
January 11, 1909
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Resigned when elected governor of North Carolina.
1903–1913
[data missing]
Vacant January 11, 1909 –
March 3, 1909
60th

John M. Morehead
(Spray)
Republican March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1911
61st Elected in 1908.
[data missing]

Charles M. Stedman
(Greensboro)
Democratic March 4, 1911 –
September 23, 1930
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
Elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Died.
1913–1933
[data missing]
Vacant September 23, 1930 –
November 4, 1930
71st

Franklin W. Hancock Jr.
(Oxford)
Democratic November 4, 1930 –
January 3, 1939
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
Elected to finish Stedman's term.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
[data missing]
1933–1943
[data missing]

Alonzo D. Folger
(Mount Airy)
Democratic January 3, 1939 –
April 30, 1941
76th
77th
Elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Died.
Vacant April 30, 1941 –
June 14, 1941
77th

John H. Folger
(Mount Airy)
Democratic June 14, 1941 –
January 3, 1949
77th
78th
79th
80th
Elected to finish his brother's term.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
[data missing]
1943–1953
[data missing]

Richard T. Chatham
(Winston-Salem)
Democratic January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1957
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
[data missing]
1953–1963
[data missing]

Ralph J. Scott
(Danbury)
Democratic January 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1967
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
Elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
[data missing]
1963–1973
[data missing]

Nick Galifianakis
(Durham)
Democratic January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1969
90th Elected in 1966.
Redistricted to the 4th district.

Vinegar Bend Mizell
(Winston-Salem)
Republican January 3, 1969 –
January 3, 1975
91st
92nd
93rd
Elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
[data missing]
1973–1983
[data missing]

Stephen L. Neal
(Winston-Salem)
Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1995
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Retired.
1983–1993
[data missing]
1993–2003
[data missing]

Richard Burr
(Winston-Salem)
Republican January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 2005
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator in 2004.
2003–2013

Virginia Foxx
(Banner Elk)
Republican January 3, 2005 –
present
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
118th
Elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Re-elected in 2022.
2013–2017
2017–2021
2021–2023
Static map of 2021-3 congressional district
Static map of 2021-3 congressional district

2023–2025
District boundaries from 2023 to 2025

Past election results[edit]

2004[edit]

2004 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx 167,546 58.83
Democratic Jim A. Harrell Jr. 117,271 41.17
Total votes 284,817 100
Republican hold

2006[edit]

2006 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (Incumbent) 96,138 57.16
Democratic Roger Sharpe 72,061 42.84
Total votes 168,199 100
Republican hold

2008[edit]

2008 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (Incumbent) 190,820 58.37
Democratic Roy Carter 136,103 41.63
Total votes 326,923 100
Republican hold

2010[edit]

2010 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (Incumbent) 140,525 65.89
Democratic Billy Kennedy 72,762 34.11
Total votes 213,287 100
Republican hold

2012[edit]

2012 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (Incumbent) 200,945 57.54
Democratic Elisabeth Motsinger 148,252 42.46
Total votes 349,197 100
Republican hold

2014[edit]

2014 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (incumbent) 139,279 61.0
Democratic Joshua Brannon 88,973 39.0
Total votes 228,252 100.0
Republican hold

2016[edit]

2016 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (incumbent) 207,625 58.4
Democratic Josh Brannon 147,887 41.6
Total votes 355,512 100.0
Republican hold

2018[edit]

2018 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (Incumbent) 159,917 57.0
Democratic Denise D. Adams 120,468 43.0
Total votes 280,385 100
Republican hold

2020[edit]

2020 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (incumbent) 257,843 66.9
Democratic David Brown 119,846 31.1
Constitution Jeff Gregory 7,555 2.0
Total votes 385,244 100.0
Republican hold

2022[edit]

2022 North Carolina's 5th congressional district election[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (incumbent) 175,279 63.15%
Democratic Kyle Parrish 102,269 36.85%
Total votes 277,548 100.00%
Republican hold

Historical district boundaries[edit]

North Carolina's 5th congressional district was created in 1789 as "the Western division; ... which shall be formed by annexing two of the Superior Court districts together, in the following manner: that is ... the districts of Washington and Mero shall form the Western division".[21] The district of Mero consisted of the counties of Davidson, Sumner and Tennessee.[22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "My Congressional District". census.gov. U.S. Census Bureau Center for New Media and Promotion (CNMP).
  2. ^ "2022 Cook PVI: District Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved January 10, 2023.
  3. ^ Auman, William T. and Scarboro, David D.; 'The Heroes of America in Civil War North Carolina', The North Carolina Historical Review, volume. 58, no. 4 (October, 1981), pp. 327-363
  4. ^ Auman, William T.; Civil War in the North Carolina Quaker Belt: The Confederate Campaign Against Peace Agitators, Deserters and Draft Dodgers, pp. 11, 66-68 ISBN 078647663X
  5. ^ "House Bill 1029 / SL 2019-249 (2019-2020 Session) - North Carolina General Assembly".
  6. ^ Doule, Steve (February 23, 2022). "Check out new election maps: NC Supreme Court rejects appeals, approves special masters' districts". WGHP. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  7. ^ "Data Courtesy of Jeffrey B. Lewis, Brandon DeVine, and Lincoln Pritcher with Kenneth C. Martis". United States Congressional District Shapefiles.
  8. ^ "Data Courtesy of Jeffrey B. Lewis, Brandon DeVine, and Lincoln Pritcher with Kenneth C. Martis". United States Congressional District Shapefiles.
  9. ^ "Data Courtesy of Jeffrey B. Lewis, Brandon DeVine, and Lincoln Pritcher with Kenneth C. Martis". United States Congressional District Shapefiles.
  10. ^ "Data Courtesy of Jeffrey B. Lewis, Brandon DeVine, and Lincoln Pritcher with Kenneth C. Martis". United States Congressional District Shapefiles.
  11. ^ "2004 General Election Results US House (5th District)". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on July 18, 2011. Retrieved January 11, 2010.
  12. ^ "2006 General Election Results US House (5th District)". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved January 11, 2010.[permanent dead link]
  13. ^ "2008 General Election". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved January 11, 2010.
  14. ^ "US House of Representatives district 5". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved July 5, 2014.
  15. ^ "North Carolina General Elections Results 2012". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved January 22, 2013.
  16. ^ "11/04/2014 OFFICIAL GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS - STATEWIDE". ncsbe.gov/. Archived from the original on January 27, 2015. Retrieved June 29, 2022.
  17. ^ "11/08/2016 OFFICIAL GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS - STATEWIDE". ncsbe.gov. Retrieved June 29, 2022.
  18. ^ "District 5, North Carolina State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement". North Carolina State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement. Retrieved November 10, 2018.
  19. ^ "November 03, 2020 General Election Results by Contest" (PDF). amazonaws.com. Retrieved June 29, 2022.
  20. ^ "NC SBE Contest Results". er.ncsbe.gov. Retrieved January 2, 2023.
  21. ^ North Carolina General Assembly (November 2, 1789). "Acts of the North Carolina General Assembly, 1789". docsouth.unc.edu. pp. Pages 1–63. Retrieved December 3, 2023.
  22. ^ North Carolina General Assembly (November 3, 1788). "Acts of the North Carolina General Assembly, 1788". docsouth.unc.edu. pp. 952–994. Retrieved December 8, 2023.

36°08′42″N 80°57′38″W / 36.14500°N 80.96056°W / 36.14500; -80.96056