Super Bowl LVIII

Page semi-protected
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Super Bowl LVIII
1234OT Total
SF 010093 22
KC 031066 25
DateFebruary 11, 2024 (2024-02-11)
Kickoff time3:40 p.m. PST (UTC-8)
StadiumAllegiant Stadium, Paradise, Nevada
MVPPatrick Mahomes, quarterback
Favorite49ers by 1.5 [1]
RefereeBill Vinovich
Attendance61,629
Ceremonies
National anthemReba McEntire
Coin tossLahainaluna Lunas football head coach Bobby Watson
Halftime showUsher, featuring Alicia Keys, Jermaine Dupri, H.E.R., will.i.am, Lil Jon, and Ludacris[2]
TV in the United States
NetworkBroadcast:
CBS (English and SAP)
Univision (Spanish)
Cable:
Nickelodeon (kids telecast)
Streaming:
Paramount+
Vix (Spanish)
NFL+/NFL connected TV app/CBS Sports digital properties[3]
AnnouncersCBS:
Jim Nantz (play-by-play)
Tony Romo (analyst)
Tracy Wolfson and Evan Washburn (sideline reporters)
Jay Feely (special teams analyst)
Gene Steratore (rules analyst)
Nickelodeon:
Noah Eagle (play-by-play)
Nate Burleson (analyst)
Dylan Gilmer and Dylan Schefter (sideline reporters)
Nielsen ratings43.5 (national)
U.S. TV viewership: 123.7 million[4]
Cost of 30-second commercial$7 million[5]
Radio in the United States
NetworkWestwood One
AnnouncersKevin Harlan (play-by-play)
Kurt Warner (analyst)
Laura Okmin and Mike Golic (sideline reporters)
Dean Blandino (rules analyst)

Super Bowl LVIII was an American football game played to determine the champion of the National Football League (NFL) for the 2023 season. In a rematch of Super Bowl LIV from four years earlier, the American Football Conference (AFC) champion and defending Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs defeated the National Football Conference (NFC) champion San Francisco 49ers 25–22 in overtime. The Chiefs became the first team to win back-to-back Super Bowls since the New England Patriots in 2004.[6] The game was played on February 11, 2024, at Allegiant Stadium in Paradise, Nevada. This was the first Super Bowl to be held in the state of Nevada.[7][8] It marked the third straight year that the Super Bowl had been played in the Western United States, following host cities Inglewood, California, in 2022 and Glendale, Arizona, in 2023.

As this was the Chiefs' fourth Super Bowl appearance and third win in five years, many have said this game established them as a dynasty.[9] It was the second Super Bowl to be decided in overtime, the first being Super Bowl LI, seven years earlier.[10][11] Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes was named Super Bowl Most Valuable Player (MVP), completing 34 of 46 passes for 333 yards, two touchdowns, and one interception. Due to the seating capacity of Allegiant Stadium, the game's sellout attendance of 61,629 was the smallest crowd in Super Bowl history outside of Super Bowl LV, which was played during the COVID-19 pandemic.[12][13]

The game was televised nationally by CBS, streamed on Paramount+, alternatively broadcast on youth-oriented sister network Nickelodeon, and televised on the Spanish-language network Univision.[14] It was also the second simulcast in Super Bowl history since Super Bowl I.[15] Super Bowl LVIII became the most watched program in American television history, with a total of 123.7 million average viewers across all platforms, which broke the average record of 115.1 million viewers set by the previous year's Super Bowl.[16][4] The game saw the highest unduplicated total audience in history with more than 200 million viewers watching all or part of the game.[17] It was the most-watched United States broadcast since the Apollo 11 moon landing,[18] attributed to the Taylor Swift effect. The halftime show, headlined by Usher, peaked at 129.3 million viewers.[19][20][21] The game's net playing time of 74 minutes and 57 seconds ranks as the longest in Super Bowl history.[22]

Background

Host selection

Allegiant Stadium, February 2024

On May 23, 2018, the NFL picked New Orleans to host Super Bowl LVIII. The league picked the winning city from a list of candidates that it had compiled, a process that replaced an earlier one in which cities that wished to host a Super Bowl submitted bids to be debated and voted upon at the league owners' meetings.[23][8]

In March 2020, the NFL and the NFL Players Association agreed to expand the regular season from 16 to 17 games beginning in 2021, pushing Super Bowl LVIII to February 11, 2024, and causing a conflict with the city's Mardi Gras celebrations.[24]

The NFL announced on October 14, 2020, that New Orleans would host Super Bowl LIX instead of Super Bowl LVIII,[25] and then announced on December 15, 2021, that Allegiant Stadium was chosen as the new site.[26]

The official logo was unveiled on February 13, 2023; it follows the updated logo template established by Super Bowl LVI, with the traditional Roman numerals containing imagery of a sunset behind the skyline of the Las Vegas Strip and the Las Vegas sign. The numerals were also slanted inward to evoke the architecture of resorts such as the Bellagio and Wynn Las Vegas. The unveiling of this logo was met with acclaim, with many praising its originality and its effective representation of the host city's spirit amid the standardized designs used since 2011.[27][28]

Teams

San Francisco 49ers

Brock Purdy was the third-youngest quarterback to start a Super Bowl. (Purdy pictured in 2021 with the Iowa State Cyclones)

Under seventh-year head coach Kyle Shanahan, the San Francisco 49ers ended the 2023 season with a 12–5 record, the NFC's No. 1 seed, and a first-round bye.[29]

Following the success of rookie quarterback Brock Purdy, who led them to an NFC Championship Game the previous season, the 49ers traded away Trey Lance, the third overall pick in the 2021 NFL draft, and made Purdy the full-time starter.[30] In his first full season as the starter, Purdy was named to the Pro Bowl, throwing for 4,280 yards, 31 touchdowns, and 11 interceptions and finished with a passer rating of 113.0, the highest in the league.[31] The offense was also led by first-team All-Pro running back Christian McCaffrey, whom the 49ers acquired midway through the 2022 season.[32] He led the league in scrimmage yards (2,023) and total touchdowns (21). San Francisco's receiving core was led by Brandon Aiyuk, George Kittle, and Deebo Samuel, all of whom gained more than 1,000 scrimmage yards.[31] The 49ers were the first team in league history to have four players with over 1,000 scrimmage yards.[33] The 49ers' offense finished second in the league in total offense with 398.4 yards per game, which included finishing fourth in pass yards per game (257.9) and third in rush yards per game (140.5).[34] The offensive line was spearheaded by left tackle Trent Williams, who received his third First-team All-Pro selection and his 11th Pro Bowl nomination.[35]

On defense, the 49ers finished third in the league in scoring defense, giving up 17.5 points per game, and finished first in the league with 22 interceptions (tied with the Chicago Bears).[36] San Francisco's defensive line featured Pro Bowl defensive end Nick Bosa, who led the team with 10.5 sacks, along with defensive tackle Javon Hargrave (seven sacks) and Arik Armstead (five sacks).[31] First-team All-Pro linebacker Fred Warner led the team with 132 combined tackles, four interceptions, four forced fumbles, and 2.5 sacks.[31] The secondary was led by second-team All-Pro cornerbacks Charvarius Ward (five interceptions and 72 tackles) and Deommodore Lenoir (three interceptions, 84 tackles).[31]

This game marked the 49ers' eighth Super Bowl appearance. The franchise won its first five Super Bowl appearances (XVI, XIX, XXIII, XXIV, and XXIX) but lost its last two before this game (XLVII and LIV). Had the 49ers had won the game, they would have been the first NFC team to win six Super Bowls and the third team overall, joining the New England Patriots and Pittsburgh Steelers.[37]

Kansas City Chiefs

With quarterback Patrick Mahomes, the Chiefs became the first back-to-back Super Bowl champions since 2005. (Mahomes pictured in 2021)

Kansas City entered the 2023 NFL season as defending Super Bowl champions, having won Super Bowl LVII. They finished the 2023 season with an 11–6 record, their 11th consecutive winning season and eighth consecutive AFC West title under eleventh-year head coach Andy Reid, and as the No. 3 seed in the AFC.[38]

In his sixth season as the starter, quarterback Patrick Mahomes had his worst statistical season in several categories, including yards per attempt (7.0), passing yards per game (261.4), interceptions (14), and passer rating (92.6).[39] His receivers struggled at several points throughout the season,[40] and going into week 18, the Chiefs led the league in dropped passes. Despite this, Mahomes set a career-high in completion percentage with 67.2% while throwing for 27 touchdowns.[41] Tight end Travis Kelce led the Chiefs in receiving yards for the fourth time in five seasons, but finished with under 1,000 receiving yards for the first time since 2015.[42] Rookie receiver Rashee Rice led the Chiefs' wide receivers with 938 yards and seven touchdowns, while second-year running back Isiah Pacheco ran for 935 yards and seven touchdowns.[43] The offensive line featured two Pro Bowl selections: guard Joe Thuney and center Creed Humphrey.[44]

The Chiefs' defensive line featured Pro Bowl defensive tackle Chris Jones, who had 10.5 sacks, and defensive end George Karlaftis (10.5 sacks). The secondary was led by cornerbacks L'Jarius Sneed (two interceptions, 78 tackles, 14 pass deflections) and All Pro Trent McDuffie (80 tackles, 5 forced fumbles, 3 sacks), along with safety Justin Reid (team-high 95 tackles, 1 interception, 3 sacks).[45]

Super Bowl LVIII was the Chiefs' sixth Super Bowl appearance and fourth in the past five seasons. Entering the game, the Chiefs had won three Super Bowls (IV, LIV, and LVII) and lost two (I and LV). The Chiefs also won one pre-Super Bowl era AFL Championship, in 1962 (as the Dallas Texans).[46]

Playoffs

As the No. 1 seed in the NFC, the 49ers received a first-round bye. In the NFC Divisional Round, the 49ers hosted the No. 7 seed Green Bay Packers. Although the Packers took a 21–14 lead heading into the fourth quarter, the 49ers rallied to win the game 24–21 thanks to a late game-winning drive led by Brock Purdy that ended with a touchdown by Christian McCaffrey. Linebacker Dre Greenlaw sealed the game for the 49ers by intercepting quarterback Jordan Love on the Packers' final drive. This allowed the 49ers to advance to their third straight NFC Championship Game and their fourth in the last five seasons. In that game, the 49ers hosted the No. 3 seed Detroit Lions. The 49ers fell behind quickly, trailing 24–7 at halftime. They scored 27 straight points to take a 34–24 lead late in the fourth quarter. The Lions scored one more touchdown after that but failed to recover the ensuing onside kick attempt, sending the 49ers to their second Super Bowl in five seasons with a 34–31 win.[38]

As the No. 3 seed in the AFC, the Chiefs hosted the No. 6 seed Miami Dolphins in the AFC Wild Card Round. Due to a cold wave in mid-January, the temperature was −4 °F (−20 °C) at this game's kickoff, which was the fourth-coldest in NFL history. The Chiefs defeated the Dolphins 26–7. The Dolphins' only points in the game came from a touchdown pass from quarterback Tua Tagovailoa to former Chiefs wide receiver Tyreek Hill. The win saw the Chiefs play their first road playoff game in the Mahomes era, the AFC Divisional Round against the No. 2 seed Buffalo Bills. This game saw five lead changes between the two teams. The Chiefs won 27–24 as Buffalo kicker Tyler Bass missed a potential game-tying field goal wide right in the final two minutes. With that win, the Chiefs advanced to their sixth straight AFC Championship Game, which they played on the road against the No. 1 seed Baltimore Ravens. Miscues on both offense and defense doomed the Ravens; the Chiefs led 17–7 at halftime and came up with big defensive stops in the second half to win 17–10. The Chiefs won back-to-back AFC titles for the second time in the Patrick Mahomes era and advanced to their fourth Super Bowl in five seasons.[38]

Pre-game notes

The relationship between supercouple Taylor Swift (left) and Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce (right) attracted significant media attention prior to the game.

As the designated home team in the Super Bowl's annual rotation between the two conferences, the Chiefs chose to wear their red home jerseys with white pants. The 49ers wore their white away jerseys with gold pants.[47][48]

As the designated home team, the Chiefs practiced at the host team Las Vegas Raiders' practice facility in Henderson, Nevada, during the week leading up to the game. The 49ers practiced at UNLV's Fertitta Football Complex in Paradise, Nevada.[49] Both teams stayed off-Strip at luxury hotels at the Lake Las Vegas resort area east of the city, with the Chiefs staying at the Westin and the 49ers staying at the Hilton.[50]

The game was a rematch of Super Bowl LIV (played in February 2020), in which the Chiefs defeated the 49ers, 31–20,[51] overcoming a 10-point fourth quarter deficit.[52] Mahomes was named the MVP of that Super Bowl. Bill Vinovich was also the referee for that game,[51] making him the first referee to preside over two Super Bowl meetings between the same teams.[53]

This game was also the first since Super Bowl LV to feature the defending champion. That game saw the defending champion Chiefs fall to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[54]

The game was dubbed by fans and media outlets as the "Taylor Swift Bowl" or "Swiftie Bowl", referencing singer-songwriter Taylor Swift and her fans, which are known as Swifties. The season broke viewership, merchandise, and ticket sales records for the NFL, following Swift's relationship with Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce and her frequent appearances at Chiefs games.[55][56][57] Fans who began supporting the Chiefs due to Swift's association with them have been dubbed as "Chiefties".[58]

As has been the case with the Chiefs in many nationally televised and publicized games in the past, some Indigenous people's groups used the high profile of Super Bowl LVIII to call on the team to change its name and for their fans to end the use of the tomahawk chop.[59]

Broadcasting

United States

Television

Super Bowl LVIII was televised by CBS, the network's 22nd broadcast of the game.[60] It was the first Super Bowl to be broadcast under the new 11-year NFL television contract, which began a four-year rotation between CBS, Fox, NBC, and ABC/ESPN.[15][61]

CBS used 165 cameras, including six embedded within the goal posts ("doink cams"), 48 for high-frame-rate video (24 of which were in 4K for zooming), and 23 for augmented reality effects.[60] Robotic cameras were placed in the city at The Strat, Planet Hollywood Las Vegas, Mandalay Bay, and the Renaissance Las Vegas; another camera ran on a wire over the Bellagio fountains.[60] CBS televised the game in 1080p with high-dynamic-range (HDR) color, upconverted to 4K UHD on Paramount+ and certain television providers.[62][60] CBS built a studio set in front of the Bellagio fountains, from which it broadcast CBS Sports Network and CBS Sports HQ programs during Super Bowl week, as well as editions of CBS Mornings and The Talk. The NFL Today began its pre-game coverage from the studio, then moved to sets outside Allegiant Stadium, then into the stadium as kickoff time approached.[63]

CBS's lead broadcast team of Jim Nantz (play-by-play), Tony Romo (color commentary), Tracy Wolfson (sideline reporter), and Gene Steratore (rules analyst) called their third Super Bowl together, joined by additional sideline reporter Evan Washburn and special teams analyst Jay Feely.[64][60] The pre-game show featured CBS Sports personalities Kyle Brandt, James Brown, Nate Burleson, Bill Cowher, Charles Davis, Ian Eagle, Boomer Esiason, Jonathan Jones, Jason McCourty, Matt Ryan, Phil Simms, and J. J. Watt.[60] The series premiere of Tracker aired after the game.[65] After late local programming, CBS also aired special Sunday-night episodes of its late-night shows The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and After Midnight.[66]

CBS sub-licensed the Spanish-language rights to its last three Super Bowl games to ESPN Deportes,[67][68] but TelevisaUnivision announced in May 2023 that it had reached an agreement with CBS to carry Super Bowl LVIII via TUDN;[69][70][71] the TUDN division was represented at the game by both Univision and Mexican network Canal 5, which produced separate broadcasts for each territory.[72] Ramses Sandoval, Memo Schutz, and Martín Gramática were the broadcast team for Univision.[73] CBS also carried Spanish commentary via SAP on the main broadcast.[74]

On August 1, 2023, CBS Sports announced that it would carry a youth-oriented alternate broadcast of the game on Paramount Global sister network Nickelodeon; the network has aired alternate broadcasts of select NFL games since 2021, but this was the first such broadcast for a Super Bowl.[75] Billed as Super Bowl LVIII: Live from Bikini Bottom, the broadcast incorporated SpongeBob SquarePants-themed augmented reality effects and features (in addition to those seen on previous games aired by the network), and live appearances by characters from the series (such as "analysts" SpongeBob SquarePants and Patrick Star, along with "sideline reporter" Sandy Cheeks) accompanying announcers Noah Eagle and Nate Burleson.[76] Nickelodeon aired the series premiere of Rock Paper Scissors after the game.[77]

Advertising

CBS charged $6.5 million to $7 million for a 30-second commercial, remaining steady with the previous year's game.[78] Several health and beauty brands bought ads during the game, with analysts suggesting that these buys may have been motivated by Taylor Swift's presence at the game, and the potential for increased viewership by women.[79] FanDuel's ad following their second "Kick of Destiny" featured a posthumous appearance by actor Carl Weathers, who died on February 1, 2024.[80] Most of the advertising time sold by CBS also included airtime on the Nickelodeon simulcast, and selected advertisers were given opportunities to participate in promotional initiatives incorporating Nickelodeon personalities. Commercials for products inappropriate for children (such as alcohol, gambling, and R-rated films) were not carried; Paramount Global sold about 15 Nickelodeon-specific advertising slots for $200,000 to $300,000 each to replace these ads.[81][82]

Amid the AI boom, a number of commercials advertised artificial intelligence (AI)-related products and services, including Crowdstrike, Etsy's "Gift Mode" (powered by OpenAI GPT-4), Microsoft Copilot, and AI-based photo editing features on Google Pixel 8 smartphones. Generative artificial intelligence was satirized by a tease for Despicable Me 4 depicting an AI art generator that was actually being run by minions.[83] A super PAC supporting 2024 presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. aired a spot, which called back to his uncle, John F. Kennedy’s campaign, during the game.[84] Kennedy faced criticism from family members and friends who argued that the ad "exploits and potentially tarnishes the legacy of a storied political family".[85]

Chinese online marketplace Temu showed their spot five times during and shortly after the game.[86] Beyoncé starred in a commercial with actor Tony Hale for Verizon.[87] Her appearance was teased by the company in the days leading up to the Super Bowl with teaser trailers referencing her sixth and seventh studio albums, Lemonade (2016) and Renaissance (2022).[88][89] At the end of the commercial, which sees the singer attempt to "break the internet" in various ways, Beyoncé says, "Okay, they ready. Drop the new music"; at that time, the singer posted a teaser video on Instagram for her next studio album.[90][91]

A Vrbo commercial was heavily criticized by Newfoundland and Labrador over the misappropriation of the folk song "I's the B'y" in a scene set in a vacation rental out of a farmhouse that is overcrowded with animals.[92] The provincial government demanded that the commercial be removed from television; Vrbo apologized on February 15 and announced that it would follow through doing so.[93]

The Super Bowl Ad Meter survey conducted by USA Today was won by State Farm for their ad "Like a Good Neighbaaa" starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito.[94]

Streaming

The game streamed on Paramount+ in English, on TelevisaUnivision's Vix in Spanish,[95] in addition to the paid NFL+ app.[96]

Radio

Westwood One held the national radio rights to the game, airing it on their various affiliates.[97] The broadcast team featured booth announcers Kevin Harlan (play-by-play) and Kurt Warner (analyst), sideline reporters Mike Golic and Laura Okmin, and rules analyst Dean Blandino. Entravision broadcast the game in Spanish.[98] Annually, over 25 million people listen to the Super Bowl via radio broadcast.[60]

International

Super Bowl LVIII was broadcast in more than 150 countries on every continent except Antarctica, including:[99]

Americas

Europe

Asia–Pacific

Middle East and Africa

Entertainment

Pregame

The American Flag out on the field for the national anthem

On January 18, 2024, the NFL announced that country music singer Reba McEntire would perform the U.S. national anthem. Actor Daniel Durant performed the national anthem in American Sign Language. In addition, rapper Post Malone performed "America the Beautiful" and R&B singer Andra Day accompanied by six female backup singers performed "Lift Every Voice and Sing", with actress Anjel Piñero and actor Shaheem Sanchez performing both songs in ASL.[108][109]

Electronic music artist Kaskade performed before and during the game, making him the first DJ to perform throughout the Super Bowl. He replaced Tiësto, who dropped out after a family emergency.[110]

The NFL invited players and coaches from Lahainaluna High School in Lahaina, Hawaii, to serve as honorary captains during the coin toss ceremony. Lahaina was one of the communities ravaged by the 2023 Hawaii wildfires.[111]

Halftime

Usher was the leading performer in the Super Bowl LVIII Halftime Show. (Usher pictured in 2010)

On September 24, 2023, it was announced that R&B and pop singer Usher would headline the halftime show.[112][113]

Usher's performance included the songs "Caught Up", "U Don't Have to Call", "Love in This Club", "Confessions Part II", "Nice & Slow", "Burn", "U Got It Bad", "OMG", and "Yeah!" (with interpolations of "Freek-a-Leek" by Petey Pablo and "Get Low" by Lil Jon).[114] The show also featured surprise appearances by Alicia Keys, will.i.am, Lil Jon, Ludacris, H.E.R, and Sonic Boom of the South.[115]

Game summary

First half

Christian McCaffrey caught the 49ers' first touchdown of the game. (McCaffrey pictured in 2019 with Carolina)

After the Chiefs won the coin toss and deferred possession to the second half, the 49ers received the opening kickoff, which was a touchback. The 49ers' initial drive gained 49 yards in five plays, with Christian McCaffrey and Brock Purdy advancing the ball into Chiefs' territory before McCaffrey lost a fumble at the Kansas City 27-yard line, ending the drive and giving the Chiefs possession.[116]

The Chiefs' first possession resulted in a punt after a three-and-out. The 49ers' following possession, which went for four plays and 16 yards, was hampered by a false start and a holding penalty. After the 49ers failed to convert a third-and-27, the drive ended in a punt. The next drive by the Chiefs, which went for four plays and ten yards, ended in a punt as well.[116]

Following these back-and-forth punts, the 49ers put up a ten-play, 46-yard drive that began at their own 17-yard line. Though the first quarter ended with the game still scoreless during this drive, it culminated in a 55-yard field goal by 49ers kicker Jake Moody, making the score 3–0 with 14:48 remaining in the second quarter.[116] It set the record for the longest field goal completed in a Super Bowl.[117]

The Chiefs began their next drive at their own 25-yard line. The Chiefs went down the field, moving 66 yards in four plays and reaching the 49ers' nine-yard line. But on the drive's fifth play, Chiefs running back Isiah Pacheco fumbled the ball, which was recovered by the 49ers.[116]

The next two possessions both ended in punts. The 49ers, after recovering the fumble, moved 21 yards in four plays before punting the ball away, and the Chiefs followed this up by going three-and-out. After the Chiefs punted the ball 50 yards to San Francisco's 33-yard line with 7:49 remaining in the second quarter, the 49ers began an eight-play, 67-yard touchdown drive that culminated in a 21-yard touchdown pass from wide receiver Jauan Jennings to running back McCaffrey. After the extra point was converted, the 49ers had extended their lead over the Chiefs to 10–0 with 4:23 remaining in the first half.[116]

The Chiefs used most of the remaining time in the half in a 13-play, 65-yard drive that resulted in a 28-yard field goal by Harrison Butker, bringing the score to 10–3 in favor of the 49ers with 20 seconds remaining in the half. The 49ers took a knee to run the clock out.

Second half

Harrison Butker successfully kicked a Super Bowl record-setting 57-yard field goal in the third quarter. (Butker pictured in 2017)

The second half began with a 49ers kickoff, which went for a touchback, putting the Chiefs at the 25-yard line. They fumbled on first down, but recovered it themselves for a ten-yard loss on the play. After a subsequent gain of ten yards on 2nd and 22, Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes threw an interception to Ji'Ayir Brown on third down, giving the 49ers possession of at the Kansas City 44-yard line. Though starting inside of Kansas City territory, the 49ers were unable to score on the possession following the turnover, going three-and-out, but pinned the Chiefs at their own 2-yard line after a punt by Mitch Wishnowsky. Following this, the Chiefs and the 49ers traded three-and-out possessions.[118]

With 9:02 remaining in the third quarter, the Chiefs had the ball at their own 14-yard line. Beginning with an 11-yard pass by Mahomes to tight-end Travis Kelce, Kansas City went on a nine-play, 47-yard drive that culminated in a 57-yard field goal by Butker.[118] This field goal, which cut the Chiefs' deficit to four points, broke the record for the longest field goal completed in a Super Bowl set by Moody earlier in the game.[118][119]

The 49ers went three-and-out on the ensuing drive. After Wishnowsky's 55-yard punt was returned seven yards to the Kansas City 25-yard line, the Chiefs ran three plays for eight yards, and punted the ball away.[118] The 40-yard punt by Tommy Townsend landed on the San Francisco 25-yard line, and hit the leg of Darrell Luter Jr. at the 49ers 19-yard line after the ball bounced; Kansas City cornerback Jaylen Watson recovered the ball at the 49ers 16-yard line, thereby giving the Chiefs possession inside the San Francisco red zone.[118][120] On the following play, the Chiefs scored on a 16-yard touchdown pass from Mahomes to wide receiver Marquez Valdes-Scantling. After Butker converted the extra point, the Chiefs had a 13–10 lead with 2:28 remaining in the third quarter.[118]

The 49ers began their next drive at their own 25-yard line. After San Francisco converted a 3rd and 5 on their own 30 on a 17-yard pass to Jennings, and 2nd and 1 on a two-yard run by fullback Kyle Juszczyk, the 49ers had advanced to the Chiefs' 42-yard line to close the third quarter. The drive continued, eventually resulting in a ten-yard touchdown pass from Purdy to Jennings after a total of 12 plays for 75 yards, which gave the 49ers a 16–13 lead with eleven minutes and twenty-seven seconds remaining in the fourth quarter. The extra point attempt following the touchdown was blocked by Chiefs linebacker Leo Chenal.[118]

Down three points, the Chiefs began to drive against the 49ers. With 9:22 left in the fourth quarter, on a 1st and 10 at the 49ers' 46-yard line, Mahomes fumbled the ball, but recovered and threw an incomplete pass on the play. The drive continued, totaling 12 plays and 69 yards; after marching down to San Francisco's 3-yard line, Mahomes was sacked on 3rd and goal. Butker kicked a 24-yard field goal, tying the game at 16–16 with 5:49 seconds remaining in the quarter.[118]

Starting on their own 25-yard line, the 49ers moved the ball down the field, getting a 1st and 10 at the Chiefs' 40-yard line after four plays. After a five-yard run by McCaffrey, Purdy threw an incomplete pass, and the two-minute warning occurred. Purdy threw another incomplete pass on third down, bringing up a 4th and 5 and setting up Moody for a field goal attempt. Moody converted a 53-yard field goal try, giving San Francisco a 19–16 lead with 1:53 remaining in the game.[118]

The Chiefs began their final drive of regulation on their own 25-yard line with 1:53 remaining. The Chiefs began to drive down the field on the next several plays. After converting a 3rd and 2 from the San Francisco 43-yard line with 42 seconds remaining, and later a 3rd and 7 from the 49ers' 33-yard line, the Chiefs had a 1st down from the 49ers 11-yard line with ten seconds to go. After an incomplete pass from Mahomes intended for Kelce, with six seconds remaining, Butker kicked a game-tying 29-yard field goal to top off the 11-play, 64-yard drive, bringing the score to 19–19 with three seconds remaining. The 49ers took a knee to send the game to overtime.[118]

Overtime

Mecole Hardman caught a 3-yard game-winning touchdown pass in overtime. (Hardman pictured in 2019 as #17)

In overtime, the 49ers possessed the ball first, driving down the field before stalling at the Chiefs' 9-yard line and kicking a field goal. Mahomes and the Chiefs responded by driving 75 yards in 13 plays, converting two third downs and a fourth down to set up first-and-goal on the San Francisco 3-yard line. Mahomes then passed to Mecole Hardman for the game-winning touchdown. This was the first game in Super Bowl history in which the lead changed hands on the final play of the game.[116]

This was the first playoff game to go to overtime since the NFL changed the overtime rules for playoff games prior to the 2022 season so that both teams get at least one chance to possess the ball in overtime even if a touchdown is scored on the initial possession. Several 49ers players admitted after the game that they were unaware of the rule change, with Arik Armstead stating that he and other players learned of the change at the beginning of the overtime period when it was displayed on the Allegiant Stadium video screen. The rule change did not affect the outcome of the game; since the 49ers scored a field goal on the initial possession, the Chiefs would still have had an opportunity to possess the ball under the pre-2022 rules.[121]

The game lasted for 74 minutes and 57 seconds of game time, making it the longest Super Bowl and 7th-longest NFL postseason game ever.[122]

Mahomes completed 34 of his 46 pass attempts for 333 yards with two touchdowns and one interception and was named the Super Bowl MVP for the third time in his career. He also ran for 66 yards.[123] McCaffrey was the top rusher of the game with 22 carries for 80 yards. He also led the 49ers with eight catches for 80 yards and a receiving touchdown. The top receiver of the game was Kelce, with nine catches for 93 yards.[124]

Box score

Super Bowl LVIII – San Francisco 49ers vs Kansas City Chiefs – Game summary
Period 1 2 34OTTotal
49ers (NFC) 0 10 09322
Chiefs (AFC) 0 3 106625

at Allegiant Stadium, Paradise, Nevada

Scoring summary
Quarter Time Drive Team Scoring information Score
Plays Yards TOP SF KC
2 14:48 10 46 4:05 SF 55-yard field goal by Jake Moody 3 0
2 4:23 8 67 3:26 SF Christian McCaffrey 21-yard touchdown reception from Jauan Jennings, Moody kick good 10 0
2 0:20 13 65 4:03 KC 28-yard field goal by Harrison Butker 10 3
3 5:01 9 47 4:01 KC 57-yard field goal by Butker 10 6
3 2:28 1 16 0:04 KC Marquez Valdes-Scantling 16-yard touchdown reception from Patrick Mahomes, Butker kick good 10 13
4 11:22 12 75 6:06 SF Jennings 10-yard touchdown reception from Brock Purdy, Moody kick failed (blocked) 16 13
4 5:46 12 69 5:36 KC 24-yard field goal by Butker 16 16
4 1:53 7 40 3:53 SF 53-yard field goal by Moody 19 16
4 0:03 11 64 1:50 KC 29-yard field goal by Butker 19 19
OT 7:22 13 66 7:38 SF 27-yard field goal by Moody 22 19
OT 0:03 13 75 7:19 KC Mecole Hardman 3-yard touchdown reception from Mahomes 22 25
"TOP" = time of possession. For other American football terms, see Glossary of American football. 22 25

Final statistics

Statistical comparison

Team-to-team comparison[125][126]
Statistic San Francisco 49ers Kansas City Chiefs
First downs 23 24
First downs rushing 5 9
First downs passing 15 15
First downs penalty 3 0
Third down efficiency 3–12 9–19
Fourth down efficiency 1–1 1–1
Total net yards 382 455
Net yards rushing 110 130
Rushing attempts 31 30
Yards per rush 3.5 4.3
Yards passing 272 325
Passing–completions/attempts 24–39 34–46
Times sacked–total yards 1–4 3–8
Interceptions thrown 0 1
Punt returns–total yards 2–0 4–12
Kickoff returns–total yards 0–0 0–0
Interceptions–total return yards 1–0 0–0
Punts–average yardage 5–50.8 5–50.8
Fumbles lost 2 1
Penalties–yards 6–40 6–55
Time of possession 38:31 36:26
Turnovers 2 2
Records set
(Unless noted as "NFL Championships", "Single Postseason" or "Pro Football History", all records refer only to Super Bowls)
Longest game 74:57[22]
Longest field goal (record set and broken in the same game) 55[127][128] Jake Moody (San Francisco)
Longest field goal (2) 57[129][130] Harrison Butker (Kansas City)
Most field goals, career 9 [129][130]
Most 50-yard field goals made, game 2[129][130] Jake Moody (San Francisco)
Most 50-yard field goals made, career 2 [131] Jake Moody (San Francisco)
Harrison Butker (Kansas City)
Highest punting average 50.8[132] Tommy Townsend (Kansas City) (5 – 254 yds)
Mitch Wishnowsky (San Francisco) (5 – 254 yds)
Most fumbles recovered, career 4[132] Patrick Mahomes (Kansas City)
Most rushing yards by a quarterback, career 172[133]
Most field goals made, combined 7[129] Kansas City (4) San Francisco (3)
Fewest kickoff returns, combined 0[134]
Records tied
Most Super Bowl games with TD pass and TD reception 1[135] Jauan Jennings (San Francisco)
Most field goals made, game 4[130] Harrison Butker (Kansas City)
Most field goals attempted, career 10[130]
Most fumbles, career 5[136] Patrick Mahomes (Kansas City)
Consecutive Super Bowl victories 2[136][137] Kansas City
Most points, overtime 6[136]
Most field goals attempted, combined 7[136] San Francisco (3) Kansas City (4)
Most field goals made, team 4[136] Kansas City

Individual statistics

San Francisco statistics[124]
49ers passing
C/ATT1 Yds TD INT Rating
Brock Purdy 23/38 255 1 0 89.3
Jauan Jennings 1/1 21 1 0 158.3
49ers rushing
Car2 Yds TD Lg3 Yds/Car
Christian McCaffrey 22 80 0 11 3.6
Brock Purdy 3 12 0 9 4.0
Deebo Samuel 3 8 0 9 2.7
Elijah Mitchell 2 8 0 7 4.0
Kyle Juszczyk 1 2 0 2 2.0
49ers receiving
Rec4 Yds TD Lg3 Target5
Christian McCaffrey 8 80 1 24 8
Jauan Jennings 4 42 1 23 5
Brandon Aiyuk 3 49 0 20 6
Deebo Samuel 3 33 0 12 11
Kyle Juszczyk 2 31 0 18 2
George Kittle 2 4 0 4 3
Ray-Ray McCloud 1 19 0 19 1
Chris Conley 1 18 0 18 1
Kansas City statistics[124]
Chiefs passing
C/ATT1 Yds TD INT Rating
Patrick Mahomes 34/46 333 2 1 99.3
Chiefs rushing
Car2 Yds TD Lg3 Yds/Car
Patrick Mahomes 9 66 0 22 7.3
Isiah Pacheco 18 59 0 10 3.3
Rashee Rice 2 5 0 3 2.5
Clyde Edwards-Helaire 1 0 0 0 0.0
Chiefs receiving
Rec4 Yds TD Lg3 Target5
Travis Kelce 9 93 0 22 10
Rashee Rice 6 39 0 13 8
Isiah Pacheco 6 33 0 8 6
Mecole Hardman 3 57 1 52 3
Justin Watson 3 54 0 25 5
Marquez Valdes-Scantling 3 20 1 16 5
Noah Gray 2 22 0 12 2
Jerick McKinnon 2 15 0 8 2
Richie James 0 0 0 0 1

1Completions/attempts
2Carries
3Long gain
4Receptions
5Times targeted

Starting lineups

Starting lineups for Super Bowl LVIII[138]
San Francisco Position Kansas City
Offense
Deebo Samuel WR Rashee Rice
Trent Williams LT Donovan Smith
Aaron Banks LG Nick Allegretti
Jake Brendel C Creed Humphrey
Jon Feliciano RG Trey Smith
Colton McKivitz RT Jawaan Taylor
George Kittle TE Travis Kelce
Kyle Juszczyk FB TE Noah Gray
Brandon Aiyuk WR Marquez Valdes-Scantling
Brock Purdy QB Patrick Mahomes
Christian McCaffrey RB Isiah Pacheco
Defense
Arik Armstead DE Mike Danna
Chase Young DT Chris Jones
Javon Hargrave DT Mike Pennel
Nick Bosa DE George Karlaftis
Dre Greenlaw LB Nick Bolton
Fred Warner LB Leo Chenal
Oren Burks LB Willie Gay
Deommodore Lenoir CB Trent McDuffie
Charvarius Ward CB L'Jarius Sneed
Ji'Ayir Brown S Justin Reid
Tashaun Gipson S Mike Edwards

Officials

Super Bowl LVIII featured seven officials, a replay official, a replay assistant, and eight alternate officials. The numbers in parentheses below indicate their uniform numbers.[139][140]

Super Bowl LVIII was the third time Vinovich refereed a Super Bowl, while Perlman and Hill officiated their final games after careers spanning 23 and 25 years, respectively.[139][140] Killens, a former NFL linebacker, became the first person to officiate a Super Bowl after having played in one (he played for the Tennessee Titans in Super Bowl XXXIV).[141]

Aftermath

This marked the Chiefs' third Super Bowl title and fourth Super Bowl appearance in five seasons, leading many sports commentators to consider them to be a dynasty.[9]

After the game, the 49ers fired defensive coordinator Steve Wilks after one season on the job, citing poor defensive performances through the playoffs including the Super Bowl.[142]

Victory parade

A 2-mile (3.2 km) victory parade ran from Sixth Street to Union Station on February 14.[143] The city council authorized almost $1 million in spending for the parade.[144]

A shooting took place at Union Station shortly after the parade. Lisa Lopez-Galvan, a DJ of local radio station KKFI, was killed and at least 21 others were non-fatally injured, including 11 children. Three suspects are arrested, two of them armed.[145]

References

  1. ^ McKessy, Jack. "What is the Super Bowl spread? Latest point spread for 49ers vs. Chiefs". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 4, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  2. ^ Wood, Becca (February 11, 2024). "Every song in Usher's Super Bowl Halftime show setlist". Today. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  3. ^ "Super Bowl LVIII was most-watched program in television history, CBS Sports says – CBS Baltimore". CBS News. February 13, 2024. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  4. ^ a b "Super Bowl LVIII Draws 123.7 Million Average Viewers, Largest TV Audience on Record". Nielsen.com (Press release). The Nielsen Company (US), LLC. February 13, 2024. Archived from the original on March 1, 2024. Retrieved February 24, 2024.
  5. ^ Picchi, Aimee (February 11, 2024). "How much do Super Bowl commercials cost for the 2024 broadcast?". CBS News. Archived from the original on February 11, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  6. ^ DeArdo, Bryan (February 11, 2024). "Chiefs win Super Bowl LVIII, becoming first NFL team since 2003–04 Patriots to win back-to-back Super Bowls". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  7. ^ "Las Vegas to host Super Bowl in 2024, sources say". Las Vegas Review-Journal. December 13, 2021. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  8. ^ a b Teope, Herbie (May 23, 2018). "Arizona, New Orleans chosen as Super Bowl hosts". NFL.com. Archived from the original on February 2, 2020. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  9. ^ a b "Patrick Mahomes and Chiefs leave no doubt in Super Bowl: They're an all-time NFL dynasty". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  10. ^ "Super Bowl 2024 Live Updates | Chiefs and 49ers to use new overtime rules". apnews.com. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  11. ^ Smith, Michael David (February 11, 2024). "NFL playoff, Super Bowl overtime rules: Chiefs, 49ers headed to extra time". ProFootballTalk. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  12. ^ Maaddi, Rob (February 12, 2024). "Patrick Mahomes rallies the Chiefs to second straight Super Bowl title, 25–22 over 49ers in overtime". AP News. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  13. ^ Akers, Mick (February 12, 2024). "Allegiant Stadium 'perfect stage' for Super Bowl sellout". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  14. ^ Lucia, Joe (May 16, 2023). "Univision lands Spanish-language rights to Super Bowl LVIII". Awful Announcing. Archived from the original on November 3, 2023. Retrieved December 17, 2023.
  15. ^ a b Bassam, Tom (March 23, 2021). "The NFL's new broadcast rights deals". SportsPro. Retrieved February 15, 2022.
  16. ^ "CBS Sports' presentation of Super Bowl LVIII most-watched telecast in history". NFL.com (Press release). NFL Enterprises, LLC. February 12, 2024. Archived from the original on February 24, 2024. Retrieved February 24, 2024.
  17. ^ "Paramount Press Express | CBS SPORTS' PRESENTATION OF SUPER BOWL LVIII IS MOST-WATCHED TELECAST IN HISTORY WITH 123.4 MILLION VIEWERS ACROSS PLATFORMS". www.paramountpressexpress.com. February 12, 2024. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  18. ^ Saunders, Emma (February 13, 2024). "Super Bowl 2024 was most watched US TV broadcast since 1969 Moon landing". BBC News. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  19. ^ Murgatroyd, Laura (February 13, 2024). "Taylor Swift effect draws as many viewers to Super Bowl as 1969 Moon landing". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  20. ^ "From Super Bowl LVIII to the moon landing, here are TV's most-watched broadcasts – CBS News". CBS News. February 13, 2024. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  21. ^ Spangler, Todd (February 12, 2024). "Super Bowl 2024: 20% of Viewers Say They Rooted for the Kansas City Chiefs Because of Taylor Swift". Variety. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  22. ^ a b Edmonds, Charlotte (February 11, 2024). "Super Bowl LVIII just became the longest Super Bowl in history, by at least some measurements". NBC Los Angeles. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  23. ^ Wilson, Ryan (May 23, 2018). "Arizona, New Orleans awarded Super Bowls in 2023 and 2024; next six years are set". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on February 16, 2023. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  24. ^ Middlehurst-Schwartz, Michael (April 3, 2020). "NFL weighs moving 2024 Super Bowl from New Orleans due to potential Mardi Gras conflict". USA Today. Archived from the original on March 16, 2021. Retrieved October 14, 2020.
  25. ^ "New Orleans to host 2025 Super Bowl; 2024 SB now TBD". nfl.com. October 14, 2020. Archived from the original on October 17, 2020. Retrieved October 14, 2020.
  26. ^ Goodbread, Chase (December 14, 2021). "Raiders' Allegiant Stadium expected host site for Super Bowl LVIII in 2024". NFL.com. Archived from the original on August 4, 2023. Retrieved August 3, 2023.
  27. ^ Andrew Lind (February 13, 2023). "NFL Unveils Logo For Super Bowl LVIII In Las Vegas". SportsLogos.Net News. Archived from the original on February 13, 2023. Retrieved February 14, 2023.
  28. ^ Foley, Joseph (February 14, 2023). "The Super Bowl LVIII logo is the most original design in years". Creative Bloq. Archived from the original on February 14, 2023. Retrieved February 14, 2023.
  29. ^ Dubow, Josh (January 11, 2024). "Brock Purdy silences his doubters and puts the 49ers in position for a playoff run". AP News. Archived from the original on January 25, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  30. ^ Wagoner, Nick; Archer, Todd (August 25, 2023). "Niners deal QB Trey Lance to Cowboys for fourth-round pick". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 29, 2024.
  31. ^ a b c d e "2023 San Francisco 49ers Rosters, Stats, Schedule, Team Draftees, Injury Reports". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on January 29, 2024. Retrieved January 29, 2024.
  32. ^ Sanchez III, Jose Luis (December 12, 2023). "The Vision for Acquiring Christian McCaffrey is Coming to Fruition for the 49ers". si.com. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 29, 2024.
  33. ^ "49ers' offense makes NFL history with unprecedented scrimmage-yard feat". sports.yahoo.com. January 2, 2024. Archived from the original on January 2, 2024. Retrieved January 2, 2024.
  34. ^ Skrive, Data (January 20, 2024). "2023 NFL Offense Rankings: Team Pass and Rush Stats". Fox Sports. Archived from the original on December 14, 2023. Retrieved January 20, 2024.
  35. ^ Pallares, Lindsey. "Trent Williams, Nick Bosa Among Six 49ers Players to Earn AP All-Pro Honors". 49ers.com. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 29, 2024.
  36. ^ "NFL Defesnive Stats: 2023 Regular Season". Fox Sports. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved January 13, 2024.
  37. ^ "When is the last time the 49ers went to a Super Bowl? History of San Francisco's big game appearances | Sporting News". www.sportingnews.com. January 27, 2024. Archived from the original on January 29, 2024. Retrieved January 29, 2024.
  38. ^ a b c "Everything you need to know for 49ers-Chiefs: Super Bowl predictions, preview and nuggets". ESPN.com. February 11, 2024. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  39. ^ Smith, Michael David (January 6, 2024). "Patrick Mahomes finishes with the worst statistical season of his career". NBC Sports. Archived from the original on January 7, 2024. Retrieved January 7, 2024.
  40. ^ Orr, Conor (December 10, 2023). "The Chiefs' Receiver Problem Is Now an Emergency". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 7, 2024. Retrieved January 7, 2024.
  41. ^ D'Andrea, Christian (December 11, 2023). "All the ways Chiefs receivers have let down Patrick Mahomes in 2023". For The Win. USA Today. Archived from the original on January 7, 2024. Retrieved January 7, 2024.
  42. ^ Kownack, Bobby (January 27, 2024). "Travis Kelce on 'resilient' Chiefs ahead of AFC title game: 'You saw the struggles, you saw the growth'". NFL.com. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  43. ^ "Ravens-Chiefs matchup features star quarterbacks, stingy defenses and potential Hall of Fame coaches". cbsnews.com. January 27, 2024. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  44. ^ McMullen, Matt (January 3, 2024). "Five Members of the Chiefs Earn Nominations to the 2024 Pro Bowl Games". chiefs.com. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  45. ^ "2023 Kansas City Chiefs Rosters, Stats, Schedule, Team Draftees, Injury Reports". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Archived from the original on January 3, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  46. ^ "Super Bowl LVIII: 10 things to know about Kansas City Chiefs". KIRO7. February 4, 2024. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  47. ^ Around the NFL staff (January 30, 2024). "Chiefs to wear home red uniforms in Super Bowl LVIII; 49ers to wear white". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Archived from the original on February 1, 2024. Retrieved February 1, 2024.
  48. ^ Breech, John (January 30, 2024). "Chiefs unveil uniform choice for 2024 Super Bowl: Here's why the 49ers might be thrilled with the pick". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  49. ^ Seeman, Matthew (January 29, 2024). "Kansas City Chiefs to practice at Raiders headquarters for Super Bowl LVIII". KSNV. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved January 31, 2024.
  50. ^ Akers, Mick (December 27, 2023). "Where will Super Bowl teams stay the week of game?". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on February 2, 2024. Retrieved February 4, 2024.
  51. ^ a b Breech, John (January 30, 2024). "Super Bowl referee returns: 49ers and Chiefs will have same official they had in Super Bowl LIV". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on February 3, 2024. Retrieved February 3, 2024.
  52. ^ Wagonwr, Nick (February 12, 2024). "49ers' title window shrinks after Super Bowl loss vs. Chiefs". ESPN. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  53. ^ Austro, Ben (January 29, 2024). "An officiating first for a Super Bowl rematch". Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved February 5, 2024.
  54. ^ "Buccaneers 31–9 Chiefs (Feb 7, 2021) Final Score". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 18, 2024. Retrieved February 8, 2024.
  55. ^ Dailey, Hannah (January 30, 2024). "Jimmy Fallon Pokes Fun at Taylor Swift Mania in Super Bowl Coverage". Billboard. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  56. ^ Bendix, Trish (January 30, 2024). "Stephen Colbert Is Hoping for a Taylor Swift Super Bowl". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  57. ^ "The countdown to the "Swiftie Bowl" is on!". YouTube. CBS Mornings. Archived from the original on February 2, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  58. ^ Rosenbloom, Alli (February 10, 2024). "Call them Chiefties? Meet the uber-fandom created when Taylor Swift entered her Travis Kelce era". CNN. Archived from the original on February 11, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  59. ^ Clark, Laura (February 8, 2024). "Ahead of Super Bowl, filmmakers challenge 'honor' of Kansas City Chiefs name, Native mascots: 'We are not OK with this'". yahoo.com. Archived from the original on February 9, 2024. Retrieved February 9, 2024.
  60. ^ a b c d e f g Deitsch, Richard (February 10, 2024). "Super Bowl Sunday viewers' guide: CBS' plans, Taylor Swift, Nickelodeon and more". The Athletic. Archived from the original on February 10, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  61. ^ Joe Reedy (February 6, 2022). "Super Bowl/Olympics Sunday about to become routine for NBC". Associated Press. Archived from the original on March 19, 2023. Retrieved February 15, 2022. When the NFL's 11-year television contract starts in 2023, NBC's spot in the Super Bowl rotation lines up the same year as the Winter Olympics.
  62. ^ Kerschbaumer, Ken (February 1, 2024). "Super Bowl LVIII: CBS Sports To Field 165 Cameras for Massive Production". Sports Video Group. Archived from the original on February 2, 2024. Retrieved February 2, 2024.
  63. ^ Director, Ken Kerschbaumer, Editorial (February 11, 2024). "Live From Super Bowl LVIII: Iconic CBS Sports Bellaggio Studio Is at Center of a Busy Week". Sports Video Group. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 15, 2024.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  64. ^ Hauari, Gabe (February 1, 2024). "Who are the announcers for Super Bowl 2024? Here's who is calling the game for CBS". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 8, 2024. Retrieved February 8, 2024.
  65. ^ Schneider, Michael (May 10, 2023). "CBS to Premiere New Justin Hartley Drama 'Tracker' Behind Super Bowl LVIII Next February". Variety. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023.
  66. ^ "CBS to Air Special Post-Super Bowl Late Night Episodes of 'Late Show with Stephen Colbert,' 'After Midnight'". Variety. January 24, 2024. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  67. ^ Crupi, Anthony (December 29, 2015). "CBS Goes Out of House, Taps ESPN Deportes to Simulcast Super Bowl 50". Advertising Age. Archived from the original on January 15, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016.
  68. ^ "ESPN Deportes nabs Spanish-language rights to Super Bowl, AFC Championship in 2021". Awful Announcing. October 12, 2020. Archived from the original on October 13, 2020. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  69. ^ Hayes, Dade (May 16, 2023). "Super Bowl Spanish-Language Rights Claimed By TelevisaUnivision In U.S.; Company Tells Upfront Buyers Its Vix Streaming Service Has Passed 30 Million Users". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on May 23, 2023. Retrieved May 25, 2023.
  70. ^ Lucia, Joe (May 16, 2023). "Univision lands Spanish-language rights to Super Bowl LVIII". awfulannouncing.com. Archived from the original on October 12, 2023. Retrieved September 24, 2023.
  71. ^ "TelevisaUnivision Announces Expansive Sports Offering in 2024". TelevisaUnivision. May 16, 2023. Archived from the original on November 27, 2023. Retrieved December 9, 2023.
  72. ^ Kerschbaumer, Ken (February 10, 2024). "Live From Super Bowl LVIII: TelevisaUnivision Is Ready To Serve Viewers in Two Countries". Sports Video Group. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  73. ^ "Univision prepares for first Super Bowl broadcast to hit viewers' homes and hearts". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  74. ^ Lucia, Joe (February 9, 2024). "Your Super Bowl LVIII broadcast primer". Awful Announcing. Archived from the original on February 9, 2024. Retrieved February 9, 2024.
  75. ^ "SpongeBob, slime to highlight Nickelodeon Super Bowl telecast". ESPN.com. August 1, 2023. Archived from the original on August 1, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023.
  76. ^ "Nickelodeon and CBS Sports reveal details for slime-filed Super Bowl LVIII alternate telecast". ParamountPress.com. February 2024. Archived from the original on February 3, 2024. Retrieved February 3, 2024.
  77. ^ "Nickelodeon Sets 'Rock Paper Scissors' Series Launch". Animation World Network. Archived from the original on January 20, 2024. Retrieved December 30, 2023.
  78. ^ Steinberg, Brian (November 2, 2023). "Super Bowl Commercials Sold Out at CBS in Earlier-Than-Expected Close-Out". Variety. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved February 2, 2024.
  79. ^ McCarthy, Michael (January 31, 2024). "Swift Effect? Some Brands Bought Their First Super Bowl Ads". Front Office Sports. Archived from the original on February 2, 2024. Retrieved February 2, 2024.
  80. ^ Tinoco, Armando (February 12, 2024). "Super Bowl Spot Featuring Carl Weathers Adds Touching Tribute With Rob Gronkowski". Deadline. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  81. ^ Steinberg, Brian (August 29, 2023). "CBS Faces New Super Bowl Ad Plays Thanks to Nickelodeon Simulcast". Variety. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved February 2, 2024.
  82. ^ Steinberg, Brian (January 29, 2024). "Paramount Sees Sell-Out for Nickelodeon Super Bowl Commercials (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Archived from the original on February 2, 2024. Retrieved February 2, 2024.
  83. ^ Ostwal, Trishla (February 12, 2024). "How AI Showed Up in Ads During Super Bowl 58". AdWeek. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  84. ^ Koretski, Kathetine (February 11, 2024). "RFK Jr. airs a Super Bowl ad that costs $7M". NBC News. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  85. ^ Nagourney, Adam (February 13, 2024). "A 30-Second Kennedy Ad Collides With a Decades-Long Family Legacy". New York Times. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  86. ^ Schulz, Bailey (February 12, 2024). "What is Temu? What we know about the e-commerce company with multiple Super Bowl ads". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  87. ^ Dailey, Hannah (February 11, 2024). "Beyoncé Confirms New Music in Verizon Super Bowl 2024 Commercial: Watch". Billboard. Archived from the original on February 17, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  88. ^ Getahun, Hannah (February 10, 2024). "The Beyhive was right: Verizon's cryptic teasers led to a Beyoncé Super Bowl ad". Business Insider. Archived from the original on February 11, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  89. ^ Roeloffs, Mary Whitfill (February 9, 2024). "Verizon Seemingly Confirms Beyoncé Starring In Super Bowl Ad—Here's What We Know". Forbes. Archived from the original on February 15, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  90. ^ Gonzales, Erica (February 11, 2024). "Beyoncé Is Bound to Break the Internet Again With Her Super Bowl Commercial". Elle. Archived from the original on February 15, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  91. ^ "Renaissance Act II: Beyoncé announces new album in Super Bowl advert". BBC News. February 12, 2024. Archived from the original on February 16, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  92. ^ Casemore, Jamie (February 12, 2024). "Canadians find Super Bowl ad featuring Newfoundland song 'condescending'". Northern News. Archived from the original on February 23, 2024. Retrieved February 20, 2024.
  93. ^ Whitten, Elizabeth (February 15, 2024). "N.L. tourism association relieved after VRBO apologizes for I'se the By ad". CBC News. Archived from the original on February 20, 2024. Retrieved February 20, 2024.
  94. ^ "Best 2024 Super Bowl commercials: All 59 ranked according to USA TODAY Ad Meter". USA Today. February 12, 2024. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  95. ^ "Este 11 de febrero... Totalmente EN VIVO desde Las Vegas ¡Por primera vez el #SuperBowlLVIII llega a Univisión y a ViX!". Instagram.com. Archived from the original on January 31, 2024. Retrieved January 6, 2024.
  96. ^ "NFL+ launches for the 2023 season; now includes NFL Network, NFL RedZone". NFL.com. Archived from the original on August 11, 2023. Retrieved September 10, 2023.
  97. ^ Lucia, Joe (March 28, 2022). "Westwood One has a new deal with the NFL, with all primetime games available for free in the NFL app". Awful Announcing. Archived from the original on March 29, 2022. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  98. ^ "Entravision on LinkedIn: Super Bowl LVIII NFL Experience". www.linkedin.com. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  99. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae "Ways to Watch Super Bowl LVIII – International". NFL.com. Archived from the original on February 11, 2022. Retrieved February 8, 2024.
  100. ^ "Where can I watch the 2023 Super Bowl in Canada?". Where Can I Watch. February 10, 2023. Archived from the original on February 10, 2023. Retrieved February 10, 2023.
  101. ^ a b "TSN and Genius Sports Partner to Deliver Inaugural Augmented NFL Playoff and Super Bowl Feeds on TSN". TSN. January 19, 2023. Archived from the original on January 23, 2023. Retrieved January 23, 2023.
  102. ^ Mann, Randi (January 19, 2023). "How to stream Super Bowl LVII in Canada". National Post.
  103. ^ "NFL and Sky Sports unveil 'Sky Sports NFL' as part of five-year partnership". Sky Sports. Archived from the original on August 21, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  104. ^ "Seven strikes NFL rights deal until 2024" (PDF). Seven West Media. January 17, 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 27, 2022. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  105. ^ ELTA Sports (November 20, 2023). "MOD愛爾達年終獨家鉅獻 NFL美式足球12/24起重返台灣螢光幕!". Yahoo! Taiwan (in Chinese (Taiwan)). Archived from the original on December 21, 2023. Retrieved November 21, 2023.
  106. ^ "NFL/季後賽名額激烈爭奪戰 台灣球迷新年看得到". UDN.com (in Chinese (Taiwan)). December 28, 2023. Archived from the original on January 15, 2024. Retrieved January 16, 2024.
  107. ^ "SPORTS LIVE SCHEDULE ON K+ WEEK 07/2024 (10/1/2024 – 16/2/2024)". K+. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  108. ^ "Reba McEntire, Post Malone, Andra Day announced as pregame entertainment lineup Super Bowl LVIII". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. January 18, 2024. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  109. ^ "Reba McEntire, Post Malone, Andra Day to sing at Super Bowl pregame". ESPN.com. Associated Press. January 18, 2024. Archived from the original on January 18, 2024. Retrieved January 18, 2024.
  110. ^ Evans, Greg (February 9, 2024). "Kaskade To Replace Tiësto As Super Bowl's First In-Game DJ – Update". Deadline. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 10, 2024.
  111. ^ "NFL recognizes, honors high school football team from Maui during Super Bowl LVIII". KVVU-TV. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  112. ^ "Usher to perform during Apple Music Super Bowl LVIII Halftime Show". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. September 24, 2023. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  113. ^ Landrum, Jonathan (September 24, 2023). "Usher to headline the 2024 Super Bowl halftime show in Las Vegas". WTSP. Archived from the original on January 31, 2024. Retrieved September 24, 2023.
  114. ^ Caramanica, Jon (February 11, 2024). "Usher Brings Precise Details to Pop's Biggest Stage: The Super Bowl". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  115. ^ Denis, Kyle (February 12, 2024). "Usher Electrifies 2024 Super Bowl Halftime Show With Special Guests Alicia Keys, Ludacris, H.E.R. & More". Billboard. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024.
  116. ^ a b c d e f "Chiefs 25–22 49ers Play-by-Play". ESPN. February 11, 2024. Archived from the original on February 4, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  117. ^ Pehling, Dave (February 11, 2024). "San Francisco 49ers kicker Jake Moody's 55-yard field goal Super Bowl record broken by Chiefs kicker – CBS San Francisco". www.cbsnews.com. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  118. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "San Francisco 49ers vs. Kansas City Chiefs Live Score and Stats – February 11, 2024 Gametracker". CBSSports.com. February 11, 2024. Archived from the original on February 5, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  119. ^ Caudell, Jackson (February 11, 2024). "Watch: Harrison Butker Nails Longest Field Goal in Super Bowl History". All Yellow Jackets. Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  120. ^ "Chiefs Pounce on 49ers' Costly Muffed Punt for MASSIVE Turn in Momentum". Kansas City Chiefs. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  121. ^ Morse, Ben (February 13, 2024). "San Francisco 49ers players admit they didn't know new Super Bowl overtime rules following loss to Chiefs". CNN. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 16, 2024.
  122. ^ Edmonds, Charlotte (February 11, 2024). "Super Bowl LVIII just became the longest Super Bowl in history, by at least some measurements". NBC DFW. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  123. ^ "Patrick Mahomes wins Super Bowl MVP for third time". ESPN. February 11, 2024. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  124. ^ a b c "49ers vs. Chiefs – NFL Box Score". ESPN. February 11, 2024. Archived from the original on January 29, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  125. ^ "Team Stats". ESPN. Archived from the original on February 4, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  126. ^ "Super Bowl LVIII". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on January 29, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  127. ^ "San Francisco 49ers kicker Jake Moody's 55-yard field goal Super Bowl record broken by Chiefs kicker – CBS San Francisco". CBS News. February 11, 2024. Archived from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 12, 2024.
  128. ^ "49ers kicker Jake Moody breaks 30-year old Super Bowl record, only to watch it get topped 30 minutes later". February 12, 2024. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  129. ^ a b c d Young, Ryan (February 11, 2024). "Super Bowl: Chiefs' Harrison Butker breaks field goal record set by 49ers K Jake Moody in the same game". Yahoo! Sports. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  130. ^ a b c d e Florio, Mike (February 12, 2024). "Harrison Butker sets all-time Super Bowl record with nine total field goals made". NBC Sports. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  131. ^ Singh, Kinnu (February 11, 2024). "Longest field goals in Super Bowl history, ranked". Fansided. Archived from the original on February 16, 2024. Retrieved February 16, 2024.
  132. ^ a b Grathoff, Pete (February 12, 2024). "Patrick Mahomes set perhaps the most obscure record of his career in Super Bowl". The Wichita Eagle. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  133. ^ Kerr, Jeff (February 11, 2024). "Super Bowl 2024: Patrick Mahomes caps another historic comeback in achieving Super Bowl first for his position". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  134. ^ Smith, Michael David (February 12, 2024). "For the first time, the Super Bowl had no kickoff returns". NBC Sports. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  135. ^ Baca, Michael (February 12, 2024). "Niners WR Jauan Jennings mired in 'disappointment' after notching passing, receiving TDs in Super Bowl LVIII loss". NFL.com. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  136. ^ a b c d e Farrar, Doug (February 12, 2024). "More than any other in history, Super Bowl LVIII was about special teams". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  137. ^ Teicher, Adam (February 12, 2024). "Mahomes: A Chiefs Super Bowl three-peat would be 'legendary'". ESPN. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  138. ^ "Super Bowl LVIII–National Football League Game Summary" (PDF). National Football League. February 11, 2024. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 12, 2024. Retrieved February 11, 2024.
  139. ^ a b "NFL selects veteran referee Bill Vinovich to lead officiating crew for Super Bowl LVIII". NFL.com. Associated Press. January 23, 2024. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  140. ^ a b "Bill Vinovich is the referee for Super Bowl LVIII". Football Zebras. January 23, 2024. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  141. ^ Smith, Michael David (January 23, 2024). "Terry Killens becomes the first person to both play in and officiate a Super Bowl". nbcsports.com. NBC Sports. Archived from the original on January 25, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  142. ^ Apler, Josh (February 14, 2024). "49ers fire defensive coordinator Steve Wilks". NBC Sports. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 15, 2024.
  143. ^ Hernandez, Joseph; Cronkleton, Robert A. (February 14, 2024). "Here's your guide to safety and security along Kansas City Chiefs Super Bowl parade route". Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  144. ^ "Chiefs fans are hoping for a Taylor Swift appearance at victory parade. But her schedule is tight". AP News. February 12, 2024. Archived from the original on February 14, 2024. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  145. ^ "Twenty-two people shot, including one killed, at Kansas City Chiefs Super Bowl rally". Kansas City Star. February 15, 2024. Archived from the original on February 15, 2024. Retrieved February 15, 2024.

External links